Foraging plants and their uses; an easy guide by Mike Poulton

Nettle tops can be used as long as they look like this!

Foraging has been done for centuries but is hopefully getting a bit of a revival, people like to have a connection with nature again, especially with their daily exercise in lockdown situation and what a better way to do this then to go out there and forage!

So today I would like to introduce you to a document received from fellow botanist Mike Poulton, who used to do training sessions on foraging for wild plants.  It was published before in my blog in 2018 but now with the aid of Gutenberg editing it can be made even more attractive.

The edible parts of the native plants are listed with their common names and categorized in 5 sections: leaves and shoots (1), herbs (2), edible flowers (3), fruits and seeds (4) and roots (5).

Continue reading “Foraging plants and their uses; an easy guide by Mike Poulton”

Easy guide to foraging plants and their uses by Mike Poulton

Goosegrass or Cleavers in flower. Too coarse to eat at this stage. With many of the edible leaves: eat in the seedling or younger emerging stage!

Today I would like to introduce you to a document received from fellow botanist Mike Poulton,  who used to do training sessions on foraging for  wild plants. The edible parts of the native plants are  listed with their common names and categorized in 5 sections: leaves and shoots, herbs, edible flowers, fruits and seeds and roots.

Continue reading “Easy guide to foraging plants and their uses by Mike Poulton”

The Dandelion

Bumblebee feeding happily on a dandelion!

To start off, a plant who most of us know very well: The Dandelion.

This is in the family of Asteraceae which is number 128 in Stace’s Flora of the B.I.  This large family has no less than 104 genera described, sub-divided in 3 sub-families and 16 tribes.  The dandelion is in Sub-family 2 or Cichorioideae, tribe 2 or Cichorieae and Genus number 33 just to dazzle you with the scientific classification! All interesting stuff though hope you agree?

Many more plants of this family will be written about in future blogs!

The true Dandelion or Taraxacum officinale no longer exists. The dandelion is so varied now that  “234 microspecies are currently recognised in the British Isles” (from Stace p. 712).

The name Dandelion comes from the French ‘dent-de-lion’ or ‘tooth of lion’.

Most of us love and/or hate the dandelion. Their en mass-flowering period is relatively short although it will carry on sending new flowers throughout the year.

image of dandelions in flower and fruit

Dandelions in various stages of its life-cycle

They are very successful and can grow virtually everywhere, but the best grow in good fertile soil where they become prolific and tend to be the most difficult to get out again!

Continue reading “The Dandelion”